Why situate the school in Abuja?
Is Loyola Jesuit College a Catholic school?
Is Loyola Jesuit College very expensive?
Why Loyola Jesuit College now? Aren’t there enough schools in Nigeria today?
Who funded the Loyola Jesuit College project?
What are the details of the entrance examination?
What if my child misses the entrance exam? Is it possible to transfer into Loyola Jesuit College?
What should my child wear to school at the beginning of term?
Can students bring and keep their own provisions in school?
When can I visit my child in the school?
When can my ward select his/her SSCE subjects?

FAQ Pic Why situate the school in Abuja? It is the goal of Loyola Jesuit College to bring together boys and girls from all over Nigeria, representing all walks of life. Our student body includes students from many different tribes and regions, and from many different economic levels. Abuja is the centre of the country, and as such, is not identified with a specific tribe or religion. Our hope is that students will feel freer to come and take part in this new venture since we are located in relatively neutral territory. Is Loyola Jesuit College a Catholic school? Yes, it is. Administered by the Society of Jesus, a religious order in the Roman Catholic Church, assisted by the Sisters of the Holy Child Jesus, the school is run on the traditional principles that have made Jesuit schools leaders in education for over 450 years. At the same time, we have a great respect for the traditions of other religious communities, and no imposition of religious beliefs is made. One of the aims we hope to achieve is to teach our students to respect other faiths. Is Loyola Jesuit College very expensive? Not exactly, the fees at Loyola Jesuit College are moderate, but not the highest for private education in Nigeria. Fees for the 2007-2008 academic year were N631,500 (Some schools charge over 1 million naira). Fees cover tuition, uniforms, sandals, textbooks and supplies, room and board, extracurricular activities and programmes; a refundable N13,000 deposit for medical fees and other incidental costs is also included, as well as N9,500 for each student as Loss of Breadwinner Insurance.
To get the best in education, you need first-rate equipment, good facilities, and the best teachers. All of this costs money and we will accept nothing but the best for our students. At the same time, we want to insure that our student body includes all kinds of students, and even before construction started, we embarked on a fund-raising campaign to provide an endowment fund for scholarships for deserving students who might not otherwise be able to afford the fees. These scholarships, partial or whole, are awarded based on the proven academic ability of the student and demonstrated financial need. One full scholarship each year is awarded to the boy and girl who have the highest scores in the entrance examination. Others will be awarded based on a combination of scores in the examination and need, as decided by the Loyola Jesuit College authorities. Why Loyola Jesuit College now? Aren’t there enough schools in Nigeria today? Certainly there can never be too many good schools, and today in Nigeria there seems to be an increasing demand for top quality education, free from political and regional conflicts and pressures. The hope of any country lies primarily in its children and the education they receive, and certainly one of the calls we hear during these days is for strong, educated, ethical and committed leaders for our country for whom the idea of service is integral to their concept of leadership. Who funded the Loyola Jesuit College project? Support for this school has come from a number of different sources. The Federal Government of Nigeria provided the land, under a 99-year lease agreement with the Jesuit Fathers of Nigeria. Funding for some of the classroom buildings and hostels came from a grant from the United States Government, a special programme designed to aid in the construction of schools and hospitals. The New York Province of the Society of Jesus has been the major benefactor of the project, both in cash contributions and in supplying Jesuit personnel. Grants continue to be solicited from private foundations around the world for various aspects of the programme. Finally, and perhaps most significantly, gifts from individuals within and outside of Nigeria demonstrate that people think this is work that is important and worthy of their help. A number of people have made sizeable gifts to the school in order to provide memorial opportunities for members of their families. Some have endowed perpetual scholarships, so that each year deserving students will receive their tuition in the name of the family member being remembered. Other have asked to have partial scholarships designated in memory of deceased family members, or to honour someone still living. Many memorial opportunities still exist at the school; for more details about memorial or commemorative opportunities, please contact the President of Loyola Jesuit College. What are the details of the entrance examination? English, Mathematics and Apptitude Test are tested for approximately 3 hours. Candidates are expected to be able to write well and will be tested among other things on continuous writing and their ability to set out their work clearly and neatly. The date for the next exam and the centres at which entrance applications may be registered will be announced in THISDAY newspaper, and our website in due course. List of successful candidates in the entrance examination will be available at the various Selling Centers and our. Interviews for successful candidates will also be conducted. What if my child misses the entrance exam? Is it possible to transfer into Loyola Jesuit College? Sorry. The entrance exam is given only once each year. Transfer students are not accepted into the school under any circumstance; all students must begin in JS 1.
What should my child wear to school at the beginning of term? For many good reasons, which include security, all students are expected to travel and arrive in the school wearing the prescribed school uniform. Your ward will be breaking the school rule if he or she reports to the school in his or her home clothes, except in JS 1. Click Here for a Complete Checklist of Items to be Brought to School Can students bring and keep their own provisions in school? No, students are not allowed to keep any provisions with them. The students are fed five times a day in sufficient quantity. Happy LJC StudentsAll items of food left with the students during parents’ visits are confiscated and given to the Principal, if perishable, or collected and donated to the poor if they can be preserved. Parents who visit should ensure that all food items they bring to the compound are consumed in their presence during the approved visiting hours only so that no food is taken back to the hostels and that no litter is left lying behind afterwards. Parents who visit at other times should not bring such food items with them as students who receive and consume them are disobeying school rules and will be punished. When can I visit my child in the school? Visitors are welcome on the prescribed Sundays twice a term between 12.00 noon and 5.00 p.m. Visitors should report to the main school gate where the security staff on duty will receive them. The students’ hostels are out of bounds to visitors. The teachers on duty and class teachers are normally available on the visiting days to deal with any problems. They should be able to report on the progress of the students in their charge in cases where parents are concerned. When can my ward select his/her SSCE subjects? In the fourth, fifth and sixth years (SS 1 – 3), students are prepared for the National Examinations Council (NECO) and West African Examinations Council (WAEC) Senior Secondary Certificate Examination which they take in the third term of their sixth year. It is the policy of the College that students choose a wide range of subjects in their fourth year in order to prepare them adequately for these exams and a future career. To this end, all fourth year (SS 1) students are expected to do eleven subjects. They may then drop one or two of these subjects at the end of the fifth year (SS 2) to allow them to concentrate on their final examination subjects.